Agile/Dev Ops

Agile and DevOps have emerged as the standard for enabling a quicker transformation, even as traditional software cycles struggle to keep up with the pace of change.  Technalink has a long history of employing and evolving Agile as well as DevOps practices, even for our own use. We understand what it takes to create a culture of agile within our customer organizations.

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Data Services

Technalink Data Services offers a range of services that leverage the enormous amounts of data derived global infrastructure utility platforms. From innovative data provisioning and data management support to robust cyber security solutions, Technalink Data Services provides clients with enhanced control and flexibility to access various types of data and established services to mitigate risk, enhance efficiency and lower cost.

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Financial Management

Technalink is devoted to providing professional cost- effective solutions, Technalink offers a wide variety of financial, administrative, and IT services to the federal government. We support our partners through implementation, support, and maintenance of commercial off­ the ­shelf (COTS) and custom financial management. By providing the effective support, our client partners benefit from proven, hands-­on solutions.

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Technalink Comittment

Technalink's commitment to cultivating relationships with industry leaders gives you access to opportunities that you cannot find on your own.

For over a decade, Technalink has been working to support and advance the careers of IT professionals. We have evolved through changes in technology and the job market to build key relationships and track a proven record of success. With a full range of specialty areas, including Agile, Development & Operations, Data Services, and Financial Management, Technalink has the experience to give you the advantage in many different industries.

Technalink News Room


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Yes, You Can Start a Business and Have a Baby at the Same Time

Henglein and steets/Getty Images The stereotypical image of startup life is a handful of scruffy twenty-somethings working 24/7 in a garage. No one has kids, needless to say, because no one has a life outside of work. That image of workaholic, childless founders is often reinforced by founders who recount stories of their firms’ exhausting, around-the-clock early days. I worry that the pervasiveness of that image – of startup life as a zero-balance zone, where kids aren’t allowed — could be keeping some talented would-be founders from striking out on their own, starting new companies, and growing the economy. In fact, when I speak with entrepreneurs, the message I hear is that having a baby and a business at the same time is daunting, but entirely doable. Moreover, I’ve seen how these founders are committ....
Most Doctors Have Little or No Management Training, and That’s a Problem

Nicholas Blechman for hbr Rising pressure to achieve better medical outcomes with increasingly limited financial resources has created an acute need for more physician leaders. Several studies (including this one) have shown that doctors want to be led by other doctors; they trust physician leaders to make the right decisions about redesigning health care delivery and balancing quality and cost. Fair or not, they believe it’s harder for leaders without clinical expertise to see how cutting costs impacts quality of care. Yet most doctors in the U.S. aren’t taught management skills in medical school. And they receive little on-the-job training to develop skills such as how to allocate short- and long-term resources, how to provide developmental feedback, or how to effectively handle conflict – leadership skills needed ....
You Don’t Need an “India Strategy” — You Need a Strategy for Each State in India

Linda Coussement/eyeem/Getty Images The Indian economy has long been an attractive investment destination for multinational corporations. Already a large domestic market, Frontier Strategy Group’s estimates suggest the country will average growth rates between 7.4% and 7.6% over the next three years. However, India remains a difficult market for multinational firms to enter. My conversations with executives, particularly those from western multinationals, often focus on the high cost and difficulty of doing business in India as one of the biggest disincentives for them to invest in the country. In one illustration of these difficulties, consider that India currently ranks 100 out of 190 countries in the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business rankings, 22 places behind China, 39 places behind Indonesia, and just....
Why Cutting Taxes Won’t Make America More Innovative

CSA plastock/Getty Images As the U.S. Congress considers the tax proposal put forward by Republicans, there has been plenty of debate over how it would affect innovation. Proponents argue that lower taxes would increase corporate investment; critics contend that the bill would hurt research universities and that the bills as written would neutralize the R&D tax credit for businesses. But the tax bill’s effect on innovation won’t depend solely on the provisions dedicated to universities or corporate R&D. As two recent studies remind us, the likelihood that would-be inventors live up to their potential depends on many other factors — not just their abilities but also the environment they grow up in; the incomes of their parents; the quality of the public services they receive, particularly education i....
Train Your Employees to Think Like Hackers

Alan king/unsplash Companies that want to help their employees become better stewards of cybersecurity need to go beyond regular trainings on password security and other basic protocols. The best way to train employees to defend against hackers is to teach them how to think like one. The first step is getting smart about what it actually means to be a “hacker.” Start by forgetting everything the media and entertainment industry has told you about hackers. The media has a history of sensationalizing the term by using it to denote cybercriminals. This is too narrow a view. In many ways, hackers are the model citizens of the digital era. They are creative, persistent, and resourceful. They think in digital terms and have the curiosity and drive to figure out how technology works. They view every problem as an o....
The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of the U.S. Antitrust Movement

Tim Evans for HBR What happened to the antitrust movement? This was the question asked by Richard Hofstadter in the mid-1960s. Antitrust, observed the historian, once was the subject of a progressive movement in the U.S. that stirred public agitation and imagination, despite few antitrust prosecutions. By the 1960s, there were many antitrust prosecutions (by both Democratic and Republican administrations), but without any antitrust movement. Fifty years later, the U.S. has neither an antitrust movement nor much enforcement. That needs to change. To understand the current moment in antitrust and what should come next, let’s take a historical perspective. U.S. antitrust policy and enforcement have waxed and waned over four cycles: 1900–1920. After initial administrative neglect and judicial hostility, this era ushered in th....
Where Employee Surveys on Burnout and Engagement Go Wrong

Amy DeVoogd/Getty Images To tackle employee burnout, companies need to assess just how burned out their staff members are—and why. Many organizations conduct surveys to gain this sort of insight, but serious flaws in how those surveys are designed often lead to bad results. Well-intentioned leaders, following an inaccurate roadmap of where the problems lie, end up wasting time, energy, and resources on the wrong things. For example, they may ask people if overwork is an issue and then try to reduce the load, when the real problem is more psychological. A seminal paper in the Journal of Vocational Behavior defines burnout as “a reaction to chronic occupational stress” characterized by emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and a “lack of professional efficacy (i.e., the tendency to evaluate one’s work negati....
The Legal Risks of Monitoring Employees Online

David Soanes/Getty Images Perhaps the most well-known data heist perpetrated by an “insider” was Edward Snowden’s appropriation and disclosure of data from the National Security Agency. The Snowden case demonstrated the cost of focusing on external threats to the exclusion of internal bad actors. In the aftermath, companies are increasingly adopting sophisticated technologies that can help prevent the intentional or inadvertent export of corporate IP and other sensitive and proprietary data. Enter data loss prevention, or “DLP” solutions, that help companies detect anomalous patterns or behavior through keystroke logging, network traffic monitoring, natural language processing, and other methods, all while enforcing relevant workplace policies. And while there is a legitimate business case for deploying t....
What Digital Change Demands of IT Organizations - SPONSOR CONTENT FROM DXC TECHNOLOGY

There’s no question that legacy IT systems are too slow and rigid for the agility that digital business demands. As companies modernize their IT infrastructure, they are looking to gain flexibility, scalability and above all, speed. And that means buying more new technology: IT organizations must adopt new platforms and processes and integrate services in new ways. Are IT organizations ready for the challenge? In a new global survey by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services, overall executive confidence in internal IT was very mixed, with only 17 percent of the executives viewing their own IT organization as being extremely capable of executing their company’s digital agenda. About 45 percent saw their IT organization as moderately capable, while over a third believe their internal IT organization is not at all capable of ....
Too Many Americans Suffer from Financial Instability. Their Employers Can Help Fix It

PM Images/Getty Images If it was ever true that “a rising tide lifts all boats” in an economic sense, it is clearly not true in modern America. Since 1980 half of Americans have been stuck in place—their wages in real terms haven’t budged—while the top 20% have seen large gains. Rising inequality of income and of wealth undermines much of the narrative about opportunity in America—that it’s a country where anyone can pull themselves up by their bootstraps. In fact, today the U.S. has a lower rate of intergenerational economic mobility than France, Germany, or even Sweden. Another form of economic inequality has been rising as well. Though it’s garnered less attention, it undermines not just families’ dreams for their children but hopes for their own lifetimes. It’s ....
Is M&A the Cure for a Failing Health Care System?

Paul Taylor/Getty Images The U.S. health care system is begging for disruption. It costs way too much ($3.3 trillion last year) and delivers too little value. Hundreds of millions of Germans, French, English, Scandinavians, Dutch, Danish, Swiss, Canadians, New Zealanders, and Australians get comparable or better health services for half of what we pay. For most Americans, care is not only expensive but is also fragmented, inconvenient, and physically inaccessible, especially to the sickest and frailest among us. It should come as no surprise, then, that when titans of our private, for-profit health care sector — like Aetna, CVS, UnitedHealth Group (UHG), and DaVita — strike out in new directions, stakeholders react with fascination and excitement. Could this be it? Is free-market magic finally bringing Amazo....
If You Aspire to Be a Great Leader, Be Present

Joed Barallas/EyeEm/Getty Images Some years ago, we worked with a director of a multinational pharma company who’d been receiving poor grades for engagement and leadership effectiveness. Although he tried to change, nothing seemed to work. As his frustration grew, he started tracking the time he spent with each of his direct reports — and every time he received bad feedback, he pulled out his data and exclaimed, ”But look how much time I spend with everyone!” Things improved when he began a daily 10-minute mindfulness practice. After a couple of months, people found him more engaging, nicer to work with, and more inspiring. He was surprised and elated by the results. The real surprise? When he pulled out his time-tracking spreadsheet, he saw that he was spending, on average, 21% le....
The Real Reasons Companies Are So Focused on the Short Term

MirageC/Getty Images This has been a remarkable year for the markets.  The S&P and the Dow indexes are up 18% and 19%, respectively.  But this run-up isn’t based on solid business foundations.  Quarterly profits have only increased 5% since 2012, but investors’ valuations of those profits (as measured by earnings per share) has increased 59% over the same period. What’s behind the disconnect?  Some argue that profits are stagnant because of short-termism—that decades of focusing on current profits over long-run innovativeness has resulted, now, in companies that are hollowed out. Indeed, a study by Rachelle Sampson and Yuan Shi found that company short-termism is negatively correlated with innovativeness, measured as RQ (“research quotient,” a measure of the return on R&D....
How Machine Learning Can Help Identify Cyber Vulnerabilities

Pedro Pestana/EyeEm/Getty Images People are undoubtedly your company’s most valuable asset. But if you ask cybersecurity experts if they share that sentiment, most would tell you that people are your biggest liability. Historically, no matter how much money an organization spends on cybersecurity, there is typically one problem technology can’t solve: humans being human.  Gartner expects worldwide spending on information security to reach $86.4 billion in 2017, growing to $93 billion in 2018, all in an effort to improve overall security and education programs to prevent humans from undermining the best-laid security plans. But it’s still not enough: human error continues to reign as a top threat. According to IBM’s Cyber Security Intelligence Index, a staggering 95% of all security incidents involve human ....
Case Study: Should a Hotel Giant Eliminate Some Brands and Refocus?

Tooga/Getty Images The business-casual dress code had Troy Freeman stumped. As the longtime CEO of Otto Hotels & Resorts, now the second-largest lodging company in the world, he’d packed for hundreds of work trips before, but suits were his go-to. Without them as an option, he was having a much harder time. His flight was leaving first thing in the morning for Carmel, where he would meet his newly expanded executive team for an offsite to discuss the company’s portfolio strategy. The facilitator, Caroline Dvorjak , was a marketing professor and a seasoned consultant. Otto had just finished a $9 billion acquisition of Beekman Hotels, which meant it now had nearly 4,800 hotels and just over a million rooms in 100 countries. Like most of the big hoteliers, however, Otto owned few of those properties; instead it franchised....
What It Takes to Become a Great Product Manager

Aron Vellekoop Len/Getty Images Because I teach a course on product management at Harvard Business School, I am routinely asked “What is the role of a product manager?” The role of product manager (PM) is often referred to as the “CEO of the product.” I disagree because, as Martin Eriksson points out, “Product managers simply don’t have any direct authority over most of the things needed to make their products successful — from user and data research through design and development to marketing, sales, and support.” PMs are not the CEO of product, and their roles vary widely depending on a number of factors. So, what should you consider if you’re thinking of pursuing a PM role? Aspiring PMs should consider three primary factors when evaluating ....
Meetings Would Go Faster If People Took the Time to Listen

akindo/Getty Images Several months ago, a CEO I’ll call Elana, who is deaf, approached me for coaching. As we talked through her leadership skills and organizational political landscape, I quickly realized she was a fantastic listener. As a deaf person, Elana is more intentional about how she listens. In our meetings, Elana and I talk at a slower pace. Elana doesn’t interrupt, and I pause whenever I notice Elana taking notes so that she has the chance to read my lips. We tend to have less confusion because Elana is quick to ask for a clarification if she doesn’t understand a word. You and Your Team Series Meetings The Seven Imperatives to Keeping Meetings on Track Amy Gallo How to Design an Agenda for an Effective Meeting Roger Schwarz Do You Really Need to Hold ....
How Technology Tests Our Trust

Rachel Botsman, the author of Who Can You Trust?, talks about how trust works, whether in relation to robots, companies, or other people. Technology, she says, speeds up the development of trust and can help us decide who to trust. But when it comes to making those decisions, we shouldn’t leave our devices to their own devices. Download this podcast
What Would You Pay to Keep Your Digital Footprint 100% Private?

Tariq Dajani/Getty Images Last year, the rather ironic rumor that Mark Zuckerberg covers his laptop camera and mic made the rounds. As Antonio Garcia Martinez points out in Chaos Monkeys, a provocative new book on the Facebook founder, “it’s not the rats who first abandon a sinking ship. It’s the crew members who know how to swim.” Or in the more famous words of Andrew Grove, a co-founder of Intel and Silicon Valley pioneer, “only the paranoid survive”. In an age when we spend a bigger proportion of our waking life online than offline, we are producing a sea of personal data, making hacking and cybersecurity bigger obsessions than ever. Where the concept of “personal” once meant “private”, this distinction no longer holds true, as so many of our personal and intimat....
Whiteboard Session: Getting Past Either-Or Decision Making

If you don’t like your choices, create better ones.
Driving Performance and Profitability in the Service Sector - SPONSOR CONTENT FROM HBS EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

The service sector is a large and growing part of our economy. But a lot of service businesses are managed according to old ideas imported from more traditional industries, says Ryan Buell, UPS Foundation Associate Professor of Service Management at Harvard Business School (HBS). In today’s rapidly changing service sector, a new set of frameworks is required to build a robust and competitive service business, says Buell. “Service jobs have a reputation for not being great jobs—and, in many cases, I think it’s a well-earned reputation. But it shouldn’t be that way,” says Buell. “Service is the business of people helping people, and when employees lack the capability, motivation, and license to perform, there’s no hope they’ll deliver excellent service to customers. Buell is faculty cha....
There’s a Gender Gap in Internet Usage. Closing It Would Open Up Opportunities for Everyone

michael suriano/unsplash We have all heard about a gap when it comes to participation of women in the tech industry. Facebook, Google, and Apple have 17%, 19% and 23% women in their technology staffs, respectively. Multiple surveys, such as the “The Elephant in the Valley,” have documented systematic discrimination against women. And there’s a continuous barrage of news stories regarding the challenges that women face across a raft of iconic Silicon Valley firms. No more than a quarter of U.S. computing and mathematical jobs are held by women, consistent with the data that around 26% of the STEM workforce in developed countries is female. In developing countries, those differences are even greater. But the gender gap problem doesn’t stop there. There’s also a shortage of women using so....
What Small Businesses Stand to Lose in a Net Neutrality Rollback

Jorg Greuel/Getty Images Deep in the golden corn fields of Iowa, technology is transforming life on the farm. For decades, the production of corn has been led by family-based businesses who operate their farms with a time-tested mix of traditional agriculture tools. But now many of them have added something new to their arsenal: a mobile app called FarmLogs. FarmLogs is a simple way for a family farm to move its fields from the pre-internet age to the cutting edge. Farmers who used to trudge down long rows of cornstalk are now using FarmLogs’ satellite imagery and algorithms to turn raw agricultural data into powerful insights. Instead of jotting down notes about plant dates, weather conditions, soil nutrients, and crop yields, farmers are crunching big data sets to better forecast profits, track expenses, and schedule operation....
How to Be More Productive Without Burning Out

Moment/Getty Images Like many of my classmates, shortly after college, I joined the ranks of a top strategy and management consulting firm. I knew I was signing up for long hours, but the reality of that didn’t really sink until a few months in, when I asked for a vacation day to go to a friend’s wedding. My request was granted, sort of. My wife handled the long drive to the wedding, while I spent my “day off” in the passenger’s seat working furiously on my laptop, with occasional stops at cafes to recharge my computer and send emails via the free wifi. This pace continued for months – even on national holidays, I holed up in my apartment to work — and I began to wonder how long I could continue. Unfortunately, this story of impending burnout is not unusual. In fact, as recently as 2012, a Gal....
What Workers and Companies Should Know About the Republican Tax Bills

Daniel Haskett/Getty Images The House and Senate have passed somewhat different versions of major legislation to restructure the federal income tax. A House-Senate conference committee still needs to reconcile the two bills, with the goal of finishing before Christmas. Both bills would significantly overhaul the corporate income tax, increase the federal budget deficit, and disproportionately benefit upper-income taxpayers. And the bills include many provisions that are poorly understood and may have unintended consequences. The legislation would dramatically change how both companies and individuals pay taxes. Here are the broad strokes of the bills, as of this writing, some of which are more positive than others. Corporate Tax Reform The bills would reduce the federal statutory corporate tax rate to 20% (which translates to about 25....